Three Things Which Will Not Be Found In Heaven – Revelation 21:4

Revelation 21:4 He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”

Don Fortner

I cannot begin to describe the bliss and glory of our heavenly inheritance. Much that awaits us is yet unknown. And that which is revealed is seen here “through a glass darkly.” But here are three things, with which all who live upon the earth are very familiar, which shall not be found in heaven.

THERE WILL BE NO TEARS IN HEAVEN – “God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away” (Rev. 21:4). Here we see much death, experience much sorrow, and feel much pain. And these things cause our eyes to swell and our cheeks to burn. But our God shall soon dry our eyes.In heaven, all that causes us to weep now, shall cease to be. Once we have left this world of sorrow, we shall never weep again! Continue reading

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The Ministry of The Holy Spirit

John MacArthur – Strength for today (Devotionals)

“By this we know that we abide in Him and He in us, because He has given us of His Spirit.” – 1 John 4:13
Experiencing the ministry of the Holy Spirit is evidence of genuine saving faith.

In John 14:26, Jesus described the Holy Spirit as “the Helper.” One of the most important ways He helps us is by assuring us that we belong to God. Several works of the Holy Spirit, if present in our lives, give evidence of the genuineness of our salvation. In 1 Corinthians 12:3 Paul writes, “No one can say, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ except by the Holy Spirit.” Apart from the convicting work of the Holy Spirit, you would not know who Christ was, nor would you confess Him as Savior and Lord. If you have experienced that work of the Holy Spirit, that is evidence you are a true child of God.

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Why I Am a Calvinist, Part 5 – 8 of 8

by Phil Johnson – Grace to You

Why I Am a Calvinist, Part 5

. . . and why every Christian is a Calvinist of sorts.

Part V: Why this issue is really a lot simpler than most people think

At the end of the previous post, I described how even in my Arminian days, I affirmed an awful lot of truth about the sovereignty of God: I would have affirmed with no reservation whatsoever that God is God; that He does all His good pleasure; that no one can make Him do otherwise; that He is in control and in charge no matter how much noise evildoers try to make; and not only is He in charge, He is working all things out for my good and His glory. As a matter of fact, my confidence in the promise of Romans 8:28 was what motivated my prayer life.

That’s Calvinism. If you believe those things, you have affirmed the heart of Calvinism, even if you call yourself an Arminian. Those are the basic truths of Calvinism, and if you already believe those things, you are functioning with Calvinist presuppositions.

In fact, the truths of Calvinism so much permeate the heart of the gospel message, that even if you think you are a committed and consistent proponent of Arminianism, if you truly affirm the gospel you have already conceded the principle points of Calvinism anyway.

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Why I Am a Calvinist, Part 1-4 of 8

by Phil Johnson – Grace to You

Why I Am a Calvinist, Part 1

. . and why every Christian is a Calvinist of sorts.  


Part I: Is Arminianism damnable heresy?

I love the doctrines of grace and don’t shy away from the label “Calvinist.” I believe in the sovereignty of God. I’m convinced Scripture teaches that God is completely sovereign not only in salvation (effectually calling and granting faith to those whom He chooses); but also in every detail of the outworking of Providence. “Whom He predestined, these He also called; whom He called, these He also justified; and whom He justified, these He also glorified” (Romans 8:30). And He makes “all things work together for good to those who love God, [i.e.,] to those who are the called according to His purpose” (Romans 8:28). Quite simply, He “works all things according to the counsel of His will” (Ephesians 1:11).

That’s what people commonly mean when they speak of “Calvinism.” When I accept that label, I am not pledging allegiance to the man John Calvin. I am not affirming everything he taught, and I’m not condoning everything he did. I’m convinced Calvin was a godly man and one of the finest biblical expositors and theological minds ever, but he wasn’t always right. As a matter of fact, my own convictions are baptistic, so I am by no means one of Calvin’s devoted followers. In other words, when I accept the label “Calvinist,” it’s only for convenience’s sake. I’m not saying “I am of Calvin” in the Corinthian sense.

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Let us not only think of ourselves

J.C. Ryle

Expository Thoughts on the Gospels: Luke volume 1,

[Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1986], 257. {Luke 8:16-21}

Let us not only think of ourselves. Let us also think of others. There are millions in the world who have no spiritual light at all. They are without God, without Christ, and without hope. (Eph. 2:12) Can we do nothing for them? There are thousands around us who are unconverted and dead in sins, seeing nothing and knowing nothing right. Can we do nothing for them?

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Faith in the Storm

From a sermon by Charles Haddon Spurgeon entitled “Wrecked But Not Reckless,”

delivered June 9, 1872.

There are many young believers who get into such a squall, and do not know what to make of it. They say, “Why, had I been a child of God I could not have drifted into this frightful tempest.” How sayest thou so? Did not David go through it? He said, “All thy waves and thy billows have gone over me.” You must be very little acquainted with the history of the people of God if you think that they are strangers to these conflicts.

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Rapture prediction: the effect on Christian Faith

Grant Swart

What follows here is another perspective on the possible effects, of giving heed to individuals like Harold Camping, could have on the perception of unbelievers regarding the Christian faith.

In South Africa, an advocate of Camping’s thinking, a certain Johannes Coetzee, received much radio and media coverage, in the days prior to 21 May 2011. In a society wherein a large majority of people are suffering from the devastating effects of the economic low and the falling away from true Faith, due to the ecumenical, secular and pagan beliefs of the majority of local society and government, the added result of Johannes Coetzee’s false predictions, has yet to be determined.

Taken from the article, James Boyett effectively states:

“What Harold Camping does, he gives people on the outside … it gives them ammunition to say ‘This man is a nut job; he’s a Christian. Christians are nut jobs. If you’re Christian, why should I listen to what you’re saying”

“My advice would be anytime you put too much faith in a fellow human, you’re going to be let down.”

“What Harold Camping said and what Harold Camping has taught is not the essence of Christianity.” Continue reading