Give No Access/Encouragement to False Teachers

Beware of wolves in sheeps clothing

Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.
(Matthew 7:15 KJV)

By Dr. Paul M. Elliott

Give No Access to False Teachers

Part four of a five-part series. 

2nd John verse 10 has a dual focus: False teachers must have no access to the church, or to the believer’s home and family – and by clear implication, to our minds anywhere, any time.

In our last article, we focused on three particular elements of the imperative to act decisively against false teachers, as we find it in Second John.

First, when dealing with false teachers, it is vital for Christians to have a complete and well-balanced understanding of agape love. If Christians focus only on certain aspects of the Bible’s teachings concerning love and ignore others, we will develop an unbalanced and harmful view of Christian love that will expose us to spiritual danger.

Secondly, we saw that acting in agape love toward our true fellow Christians requires us to act toward false teachers in a way that some would mistakenly label as “unloving.” This false accusation stems from a myopic, unbalanced view of the Bible’s imperatives.

Thirdly, we saw that agape love, which is always rooted in truth, demands that Christians act decisively to block the deadly influence of false teachers upon themselves, their homes, and their churches. That is the basis of the command we are given in verse ten: “[D]o not receive [the false teacher] into your house nor greet him, for he who greets him shares in his evil deeds.”

The agape love that is central to genuine Christian unity recognizes the fact that every believer in Christ is precious to God. Therefore, every one of your fellow believers in Christ should be precious to you. The climactic point of John’s second epistle, found in verses nine and ten, is this: Agape love may require that you do the difficult thing by utterly rejecting false teachers, in order to maintain a church unity that is genuine, and not a counterfeit – but a Christian must never hesitate to do it, because God commands it. Continue reading

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Die Kruis red; die Kruis verlos. Die ware Evangelie van geloof.

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TULIP en Die Ware Evangelie

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Totale onvermoë dood in jou sonde

Uitverkies sonder voorwaardes

Lewe aflê vir Sy Skape Alleen

Innerlike onweerstaanbare genade

Preserveer vir ewig

 

Isa 53:11  Weens die moeitevolle lyde van sy siel sal Hy dit sien en versadig word; deur sy kennis sal my Kneg, die Regverdige, baie regverdig maak; en Hy sal hulle skuld dra.

Dit was Volbring en wat die God van die Kosmos gekom het om te doen, was Hy mee tevrede; dat diegene wat Hy regverdig wil maak, het Hy volkome regverdig gemaak. Nie een gaan verlore wat Hy in Sy ewige Raadsplan vir Sy Bruid kies nie. Sy plan was nie gefnuik deur enige van Sy skepsels nie, want Hy is nie in hulle hande nie maar hulle in Syne. Die vlekkelose Bruid is nie die een wat Jesus Christus nie geweet het wie dit gaan wees nie, en tot met die wederkoms eers, Sy versluierde een met verbasing sal aanskou nie. Nee, God weet wie is die Bruid, want Hy het hulle elkeen gekies voor die grondlegging van die wêreld af, om ʼn reine Bruid te hê, wat Hy vlekkeloos en heilig kom maak het.

Inleiding

Toe die wet daar was, was dit maklik om te verklaar hoekom sommige die ewige lewe beërwe en hoekom sommige deur die wet geoordeel word. Dit was wit of swart, hemel of hel, God se skaap of die duiwel se bok, verlore of gered deur die wet te gehoorsaam of die wet te oortree. Dan was dit jou skuld dat jy verlore gaan, of dit was jou goedheid en getrouheid wat jou die hemel laat beërwe, “getroue dienskneg kom staan hier by die skape, ontroue gaan na die ewige verderf voorberei vir die duiwel en sy engele”. Nie dat die wet enigeen gered het nie. Die nuwe evangelie is nie veel anders in sy sienswyse nie, jy gehoorsaam die “wet” van “keuse maak”. Continue reading

Differences between Semi-Pelagianism and Arminian Beliefs

by John Hendryx

[Semi-Pelagianism]
While not denying the necessity of Grace for salvation, Semi-Pelagianism maintains that the first steps towards the Christian life are ordinarily taken by the human will and that Grace supervened only later.

[Arminianism]
In contrast to semi-pelagianism, Arminianism teaches that the first steps of grace are taken by God. This teaching derives from the Remonstrance of 1610, a codification of the teachings of Jacob Arminius (1559-1609). Here are the 3rd and 4th articles of five to show how close it actually approaches traditional Calvinism, but still leaves man with a small island of righteousness, as it affirms that, unregenerate man can think spiritual thoughts, perceive the beauty and excellency of Christ, create affections for Him and thus turn in faith to Him, apart from the quickening of the Holy Spirit. They affirm that God’s grace is always resistible, therefore, when one believes, it is not grace which makes one to differ from another person, but naturally produced faith:

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The Pelagian Captivity of the Church

By Vernelle Imaging

by R.C. Sproul

Shortly after the Reformation began, in the first few years after Martin Luther posted the Ninety-Five Theses on the church door at Wittenberg, he issued some short booklets on a variety of subjects. One of the most provocative was titled The Babylonian Captivity of the Church. In this book Luther was looking back to that period of Old Testament history when Jerusalem was destroyed by the invading armies of Babylon and the elite of the people were carried off into captivity. Luther in the sixteenth century took the image of the historic Babylonian captivity and reapplied it to his era and talked about the new Babylonian captivity of the Church. He was speaking of Rome as the modern Babylon that held the Gospel hostage with its rejection of the biblical understanding of justification. You can understand how fierce the controversy was, how polemical this title would be in that period by saying that the Church had not simply erred or strayed, but had fallen — that it’s actually now Babylonian; it is now in pagan captivity.

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Modern Reformation

The Pelagian Captivity of the Church

R. C. Sproul

Shortly after the Reformation began, in the first few years after Martin Luther posted the Ninety-Five Theses on the church door at Wittenberg, he issued some short booklets on a variety of subjects. One of the most provocative was titled The Babylonian Captivity of the Church. In this book Luther was looking back to that period of Old Testament history when Jerusalem was destroyed by the invading armies of Babylon and the elite of the people were carried off into captivity. Luther in the sixteenth century took the image of the historic Babylonian captivity and reapplied it to his era and talked about the new Babylonian captivity of the Church. He was speaking of Rome as the modern Babylon that held the Gospel hostage with its rejection of the biblical understanding of justification. You can understand how fierce the controversy was, how polemical this title would be in that period by saying that the Church had not simply erred or strayed, but had fallen-that it’s actually now Babylonian; it is now in pagan captivity.