Osama Bin Laden killed: Why it’s OK to rejoice, (but not gloat)

Grant Swart

In the light of developments earlier today in the international war on terror, I thought it appropriate to re-post this article by Pastor Bill Randles, himself a citizen of theUSA. Hundreds of secular articles written under the guise of Christian opinion, have been placed on the internet by proponents of the ecumenical church such as Brian McLaren, following the merciful removal of the threat of the terrorist, Osama Bin Laden. Those articles are mostly in keeping with the immensely popular social gospel of tolerance above truth, which discredits the Christian position rather than represents it. The article by Bill Randles, which I have added at the bottom, offers a Christian perspective an is certainly worth reading again.

Shortly after the international incident, President Obama of the USA, in his televised address, missed yet another great opportunity to thank, (or at the very least mention), the Lord God for assisting their armed forces efforts in protecting the freedom of Christians. Continue reading

Advertisements

The Significance of the Ascension

John MacArthur – Grace to You

Luke 24:50-53

December 21, 2008

Well, this is a special Lord’s day in the sense of our text of Luke because we have finally come to the final paragraph in Luke’s gospel, and we close out this great history with many wonderful memories of what we have learned in these ten years in Luke, many wonderful benefits spiritually to these great truths, this great account of Christ. Let’s look together at the final paragraph, verses 50 to 53.

Before I read them to you, just simply to make a comment. This is the brief account of the ascension of Christ into heaven, having completed His earthly journey and His earthly work. It is a significant event, maybe, in some ways, far more significant than most people give it credit for. In our culture we have a tradition of honoring the birth of people. We celebrate birthdays. When there is someone important, we make note of their birthday. Sometimes we even make national holidays out of the birthday of famous people, Presidents, and so forth. We do that not because their birth was significant, because none of their births were really significant. And when they were born, they had accomplished absolutely nothing. So at the risk of seeming a little bit odd, may I suggest another approach? That we begin to celebrate the death day of significant people which marks the culmination of their achievement.

Continue reading