Mystica Scriptura

By on Feb 20, 2012

MYSTICA SCRIPTURA [(mis’-tik-uh) (skriptər’ uh)]

[Mystica:1275–1325; Middle English mystic; Latin mysticus; Greek mystikós, equivalent to mýst (ēs) an initiate into the mysteries + -ikos -ic; akin to myeîn to initiate, teach] [Scriptura: 1250–1300; Middle English and Latin scrīptūra writing. See script, -ure]

  1. The teaching that in Scripture all things are not plain, nor sufficient, nor alike clear unto all, but that God’s Word needs to be enhanced by extra-scriptural rituals, practices and ceremonies (i.e., meditative techniques, art, dance, drama, chanting, music, etc.) that induce and alter religious feelings in observers and participants. In an ecstatic state induced by these mechanical means, worshippers may experience altered states of consciousness that they believe will enable them to penetrate the spiritual mystery which surrounds humanity’s existence. Continue reading

Nebula Scriptura

By on Jan 31, 2012

NEBULA SCRIPTURA ([neb’ yuh luh] [skrɪpt ər’ uh])

[(1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin nebulōsus full of mist, foggy, cloudy; related to Greek nephétē cloud, Old High German nebul cloud, Old Norse njól  night). (1250–1300; Middle English < Latin scrīptūra writing. See script, -ure)]

  1. Hazy, vague, indistinct, irrational, unsound or confused biblical doctrine, theology, interpretation or teaching.
  2. Biblical interpretation lacking definite form, shape, or content; doctrine that is vague or amorphous, continually fluctuating and shifting. Continue reading