The Singularity of the Gospel

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I marvel that ye are so soon removed from him that called you into the grace of Christ unto another gospel: Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ. But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed. As we said before, so say I now again, If any man preach any other gospel unto you than that ye have received, let him be accursed. For do I now persuade men, or God? or do I seek to please men? for if I yet pleased men, I should not be the servant of Christ.”                                                         (Galatians 1:6-10)

It is utterly astonishing to a believer that anyone, having heard and having professed to believe the gospel of God’s free, sovereign, saving grace in Christ, could be enticed to abandon it for another gospel (Which is no gospel at all!) of legality, works, or a mixture of grace and works (Rom. 11:5-6) But that is exactly what had happened in Galatia. Paul’s purpose in writing this epistle was to expose and reprove those as heretics who attempt to mix the works of men with the work of Christ, and to establish God’s elect in the gospel of God’s grace and glory in Christ.

False teachers had crept into the Galatian churches perverting the gospel of Christ. While professing to be followers of Christ, they sought to mingle the works of the law with faith in Christ. They were persuading the people to abandon the gospel Paul had taught them, adding to faith in Christ the works of the law. The apostle Paul had taught them that Christ crucified is the only, all-sufficient, and effectual Savior of men, and that faith in him is the only way we can receive his finished salvation (Rom. 5:11). He had proved the truth of all his declarations by miracles. These Galatians professed to believe the gospel as it was preached and confirmed by the apostle. They had been so thankful for Paul bringing the gospel to them that they received him as an angel of God, and would have, had it been possible, plucked out their own eyes and given them to him. Yet, within a short time, these converts were induced by the eloquent discourses of false teachers to renounce Paul and the gospel of Christ, and to receive in its place a message contrary to the glorious gospel Paul had taught them. Therefore, he wrote this letter by divine inspiration, filled with indignation, sorrow, and astonishment. Continue reading

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From Baptismal Font to Damnation

baptism under water

Grant Swart

From Baptismal Font to Damnation 

– there is a road which seems right, but which ends in perdition

It is imperative that we choose the right road. Only the right road leads to the right destination. Taking the wrong road will lead one to the wrong destination, which could obviously cause great trouble.

This is true regarding most matters, but in particular it holds true regarding our eternal destination, which makes it of even greater importance. There are only two places where we can spend eternity – either in eternal glory or in eternal hell. We will either be with God for ever or we will be forever separated from His presence. Eternal joy, or eternal sorrow. Both are final destinations and there will be no turning back. For this very reason it is imperative that we make the right choice, in order for us to be sure.

It is not always simple to make the right choice, and Proverbs 14:12 warns us about a road which seems to be the right one, but which end leads to DEATH.

”There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way to death.” (ESV)

”There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way to death.” (KJV)

There are many roads which seem to be right or feel right, but which do not lead to life. Let us take a look down a few of the roads which people perceive to be the right ones, but which end in eternal sorrow: Continue reading